Healthy Communities: Immunisation rates for children in 2015–16 - Report - Immunisation rates for all children

Healthy Communities: Immunisation rates for children in 2015–16

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Immunisation rates for all children

Immunisation programs are a safe and effective way of reducing the spread of vaccine-preventable diseases in the community and protecting against potentially serious health problems.

Although the majority of Australian children are immunised, it is important to maintain high immunisation rates to reduce the risk of outbreaks of serious diseases.

This report presents local-level childhood immunisation information to help clinicians and health managers target their efforts to protect the health of children and the broader community.

Where possible, we give the numbers of children not fully immunised. There may still be a large number of children not fully immunised in areas where immunisation rates are high.

The percentages of all children fully immunised and the numbers of children not fully immunised in 2015–16 are outlined below, at a national level and showing the range across Australia’s 31 PHN areas.

For 1 year olds, 93.0% were fully immunised, while 21,527 children were not fully immunised nationally. Rates across PHN areas ranged from 95.0% in Murrumbidgee (NSW) to 89.8% in North Coast (NSW).

For 2 year olds, 90.7% were fully immunised, while 28,614 children were not fully immunised nationally. Rates across PHN areas ranged from 93.2% in Murrumbidgee (NSW) to 87.2% in North Coast (NSW).

For 5 year olds, 92.9% were fully immunised, while 22,128 children were not fully immunised nationally. Rates in PHN areas ranged from 96.1% in Western NSW to 90.3% in North Coast (NSW).

There was considerable variation across PHN areas in the percentage of children fully immunised among the three age groups in 2015–16, as shown in Figure 3.

All Australian children are expected to have received specific immunisations by a certain age according to the National Immunisation Program Schedule (Figure 2), to ensure that children have maximum protection for their age if they come into contact with harmful viruses and bacteria.

Fully immunised status is measured at ages 1, 2 and 5 years and means that a child has received all of the scheduled vaccinations appropriate for their age.

In 2014, the Australian Chief Medical Officer and all state and territory chief health officers agreed to the national aspirational target of 95% of all children fully immunised.

Figure 2: The National Immunisation Program Schedule – vaccinations required for fully immunised status for 1, 2 and 5 year old children in 2015–16

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Age due Vaccinations Fully immunised status
2 months
  • Hepatitis B (hepB)
  • Diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough (DTPa)
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)
  • Polio (IPV)
  • Pneumococcal conjugate
4 months
  • Hepatitis B (hepB)
  • Diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough (DTPa)
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)
  • Polio (IPV)
  • Pneumococcal conjugate
6 months
  • Hepatitis B (hepB)
  • Diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough (DTPa)
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)
  • Polio (IPV)
  • Pneumococcal conjugate
12 months
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)
  • Meningococcal C
  • Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR)
1 year
18 months
  • Measles, mumps, rubella and varicella (chickenpox) (MMRV)
2 years
4 years
  • Diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough (DTPa)
  • Polio (IPV)
  • Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) (only if MMRV vaccine was not given at 18 months)
5 years

Source Australian Government Department of Health, National Immunisation Program Schedule, www.immunise.health.gov.auExternal link, opens in a new window.

Figure 3: Percentage of all children fully immunised and numbers not fully immunised, by Primary Health Network area, 2015–16

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Primary Health Network 1 year 2 years 5 years No. not fully immunised (1, 2, & 5 years combined)
Western NSW 94.4% 92.5% 96.1% 721
Murrumbidgee (NSW) 95.0% 93.2% 96.0% 481
Hunter New England & Central Coast (NSW) 94.9% 92.3% 95.4% 2,692
Gippsland (Vic) 94.3% 92.5% 94.9% 584
South Eastern NSW 94.3% 92.3% 94.7% 1,285
Nepean Blue Mountains (NSW) 94.2% 91.3% 94.7% 1,008
Western Queensland 93.3% 91.0% 94.4% 232
Western Victoria 94.0% 92.6% 94.2% 1,432
Murray (Vic & part NSW) 93.0% 92.1% 94.2% 1,523
Northern Queensland 93.0% 91.8% 94.1% 2,041
South Western Sydney (NSW) 92.4% 90.2% 94.0% 3,309
Darling Downs & West Moreton (Qld) 93.8% 91.8% 94.0% 1,630
Tasmania 93.5% 90.7% 93.8% 1,315
Country WA 93.0% 90.8% 93.6% 1,661
Australian Capital Territory 94.4% 91.8% 93.5% 1,138
Country SA 93.7% 90.8% 93.4% 1,237
North Western Melbourne (Vic) 92.5% 90.4% 93.2% 5,463
Eastern Melbourne (Vic) 93.3% 91.2% 93.2% 3,912
Western Sydney (NSW) 91.5% 88.8% 93.0% 3,911
Brisbane North (Qld) 93.8% 92.4% 92.9% 2,507
South Eastern Melbourne (Vic) 92.6% 90.5% 92.6% 4,614
Brisbane South (Qld) 93.1% 91.8% 92.3% 3,481
Northern Territory 93.0% 88.9% 91.9% 940
Adelaide (SA) 92.7% 90.4% 91.9% 3,598
Central Qld, Wide Bay & Sunshine Coast 92.5% 90.6% 91.6% 2,526
Central & Eastern Sydney (NSW) 92.4% 89.8% 91.5% 4,819
Northern Sydney (NSW) 92.7% 89.4% 91.3% 2,987
Gold Coast (Qld) 92.9% 89.5% 90.8% 1,917
Perth South (WA) 92.3% 88.8% 90.8% 3,750
Perth North (WA) 92.6% 88.8% 90.8% 3,750
North Coast (NSW) 89.8% 87.2% 90.3% 1,867
National results 93.0% 90.7% 92.9% 72,269

Notes

  • Components may not add to totals due to rounding.
  • Data are reported to one decimal place, however for graphical display and ordering they are plotted unrounded.

Source Australian Institute of Health and Welfare analysis of Department of Human Services, Australian Immunisation Register statistics, for the period 1 April 2015 to 31 March 2016 as at 30 June 2016. Data supplied 2 March 2017.

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