Healthy Communities: Coordination of health care – experiences with GP care among patients aged 45 and over, 2016 - Report - Next steps

Healthy Communities: Coordination of health care – experiences with GP care among patients aged 45 and over, 2016

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Next steps

The 2016 Survey of Health Care is a rich resource of detailed information on coordination and continuity in health care in Australia (Figure 6.1). Due to the complexity and magnitude of information collected in this survey, publications from the Coordination of Health Care Study have been separated into themes to allow in-depth exploration of particular aspects of coordination and continuity in care.

Figure 6.1: Structure of the 2016 Survey of Health Care

An image showing the structure of the 2016 Survey of Health Care.

* for physical health and mental health (emotional and psychological health)

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This image is a circular diagram of the structure of the 2016 Survey of Health Care. The central circle includes the patient, their needs, preferences and demographics, with their health, lifestyle, medications and tests feeding into this centre. This central circle is enveloped by the patients’ usual GP at usual place, usual place, different GPs, usual GP at different places or neither usual GP nor usual place. Feeding into this central patient-GP relationship are specialist doctors, emergency departments, hospitals, allied health (for physical health and mental health (emotional and psychological health)), and other GPs. The outer circle of this figure shows the three key aspects of patient-centred care emerging from this model: comprehensive and coordinated care, accessible care, and patient-centred and responsive care.

The scope of this publication is limited to the foundation of patient-centred care, shown at the centre of Figure 6.1: care with a usual GP or usual place of care. The main themes explored are the way patients use GP care, and their reported experiences with this care—especially in the context of patient-centeredness. Future publications from the study will explore:

  • coordination of care between a patient’s usual GP or place of care and other health care providers, such as specialists, hospitals or allied health professionals
  • communication between both the patient and GP, and GP and other providers
  • accessibility of care (including barriers to access).

It is expected that future publications from the Coordination of Health Care Study will include Survey of Health Care data linked to administrative data sets, including hospital admissions and emergency department data, MBS data and PBS data. This will facilitate further exploration of the impact of coordination and continuity of care on health outcomes and health system usage.

Download Report (PDF, 9.5 MB)